dance 2018

3 things latin-dance promoters and artists should stop doing.

1.  Having multiple personal Facebook accounts.   We've all seen it and have had to deal with it.  At the end of the person's name they have full, I, or II - i.e., My Name Full, My Name I, My Name II. 

This is frustrating when you don't know which account to add/follow.  Also, when you need to reach someone but you don't know which profile to message.  You message one profile but they respond with another.  On top of multiple personal profiles, they have an artist page, a dance company page, and a joint partner page which complicates things further.

What's the solution? It's simple: You delete or convert your additional personal pages and allow people to follow you.  You can have an unlimited amount of followers.  Sure, you'll loose some friends when you delete those extra accounts, but it's worth the short-term expense.  The convenience of properly managing and communicating through one personal FB account is worth it in the long-term.

If you are maxed out at 5k friends, turn on the follow option.  When people try and add you as a friend they are automatically following you.  You can then remove the request request and you are good to go!

2.  SPAM tagging you on FB for every event.  (Even if they know you aren't in the country) Getting notifications is annoying enough.  But getting the same notification from the same promoter every week and having to untag yourself gets incredibly exhausting.  Also, if it's the same weekly event thats been going for the last 5 years, there is definitely no need to be tagging anyone.

Once you create an event, it will automatically appear on everyone's upcoming events that you're friends with.  Unless you are directly involved with hosting the event, no one else should be tagged.  Also, SPAM tagging has become increasingly popular with artists who have a new demo that they just released.   Just like events, demos are filmed almost every day so tagging people who have seen similar demos can becoming draining as well.

3.  Adding dancers to groups that they don't want to be added to.  Groups are extremely convenient in FB when used properly and where valuable information is exchanged.  Unfortunately, in the dance world, 95% of groups are SPAM groups.  Promoters from all over the world post their event, festival, or ****NEW DEMO ALERT*** in every group imaginable.  They spend hours copying and pasting the same text in every group hoping they will get likes or shares.  Facebook has complex algorithms that can pick up on multiple postings using the same text.

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I've had people add me as friends just so they can add me on a group.  When you leave the group you've been forced to join without your permission, be sure to click the box 'Prevent others from adding me to this group.'  

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Additional tips for the dance community:

-If you notice these three things happening to you on a regular basis, just unfriend the person.  Just because you unfriend them on FB, does not mean you aren't friends with them in the real world.  It's nothing personal.

-In your privacy settings, be sure to prevent posts from being posted on your wall without your approval.  

-Going live on facebook is probably the most annoying things I see on a daily basis.  Facebook is really trying to push individuals and businesses to go live.  I don't recommend going live unless you are partying with Justin Bieber.  

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With more and more events and festivals popping up every month, promoters and artists are desperate for attention.  It's important to identify those that are marketing themselves the right way, versus those are not.

If you found this article helpful, let me know.  Let me know what other things annoy you in the latin-dance world of Facebook.  Tag a friend, share this article, and let's improve how promoters and artists market themselves in the latin-dance scene.

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Brazilian Zouk in Mexico

It's only a matter of time before we see Brazilian Zouk festivals in major cities in Mexico.  Salsa and Bachata have ruled the scene for years, and now we are seeing Kizomba make it's way into the scene and it's growing faster and stronger than ever.

This year, Brazilian Zouk made it's way to Puerto Vallarta, Mexico.  It's a beautiful city located on the coast about a three hour drive from Guadalajara.  The event was located in a small and intimate hotel with mostly Mexican tourists.  

Many of the dancers traveled from Mexico City and Guadalajara.  Brazilian Zouk is relatively new to Mexico, so the level of dancing was not very high.   However, dancers were eager to learn and picked up the basics in no time.  By the end of the congress, many were dancing well and had learned the fundamentals.

Brazilian Zouk may seem difficult at first.  However, if you learn fast and put your mind to it, it's really not that difficult - whether you are a lead or follow.  The biggest tip I can give is don't be intimidated.  Treat Zouk like any other partner dance and focus on building the basics.  The advanced patterns and head movements will follow later.

Overall, the turnout was great even with poor weather and the earthquake that took place a couple weeks before the event.  The organizers are very friendly and are excited about 2018 being even bigger and more fun.   Small, intimate, and creative festivals are always more fun than bigger festivals.

Here is the recap from the 2017 Zoukadise Festival, enjoy!!!